You Reap What You Sow

How people treat you is their karma; how you react is yours.”  ~Wayne Dyer

The literary industry can’t withstand what happened to the music industry. We can’t build houses of sticks and straw and expect them to weather the storm. Media piracy sucks the lifeblood out of the entertainment business, but as wounded as musicians have been over the illegal distribution of their material, they won’t hurt like authors will.

Just two weeks after the release of Son of Ereubus, a ridiculous amount of downloads have been completed. Really, it’s staggering. I had to take a screen shot because I couldn’t believe what I was seeing (still don’t). Compounding this is the fact that it went viral. I’ve seen it in forums, multiple free torrent sites and a few membership only ones.

I’m not Stephen King folks…and I’m flattered that someone out there, somewhere, thinks it’s good enough to steal. Honestly. But that warm fuzzy feeling, like a good strong night’s worth of drinks, leads to nothing but a vicious migraine and one hell of a stomach ache.

With the dawn of new technology and the ever-changing format of material, our rear-ends have to get in gear here or we’re going to be left in the dust. Again. Why do I say again?

How many authors, who are signed with large publishing houses, who have awesome (big name) agents, can afford to write full time? Answer: Not as many as you’d think. 

Artists are often in this same boat. Even being featured in well-known galleries doesn’t mean that your work will necessarily afford you a decent lifestyle. I suppose it depends on your definition. But, how do you take what isn’t there to be taken? An author’s royalties, even before you take out an agent’s 20%, are SO minimal…that the idea of losing a good portion of that income because of piracy makes my insides hurt. I’m not saying that this is the case with Son of Ereubus. I’m published with a very small press, so I don’t expect to earn a ton anyway. I’m sure sales have been affected, but I’m talking on a wide-scale basis here. This hits home with everyone who ever hopes to earn a living from selling their fiction, whether they realize it yet or not.

Now, pair this with all of the other “hot  topics” out there right now: E-book vs Paper, Paperback vs Hardcover, Self-publish vs Traditional, POD vs Print Run, Large Print Run vs Small Print Run, Small Press vs Big Five, Literary Fiction vs Pop Fiction, Listed at P&E as Gold vs Listed on P&E as Evil, To Blog vs Not to Blog, Social Media Savvy vs Being a J.D. Salinger Hermit, All Rights Contracts vs Limited Rights Contracts ….really??? Are you guys hearing me here? WE HAVE ISSUES….and not the kind of issues that “I”m OK, You’re OK” can fix. And don’t even get me started on the whole audio rights and ereaders thing… 

Back to the problem of piracy…a lot of these torrent sites are over seas. Right now…there’s next to nothing that can be done about it. So, I did the only thing I could do—I went to my J.S. Chancellor FB page and asked that if anyone had downloaded it illegally, liked it, and was on my page as a result, would they please consider leaving a review of the book somewhere. I don’t exactly consider that an even trade, but I know what it’s like to not be able to afford to read a book you want to read. Yes, I’m aware that some downloaders can afford to buy it but are too cheap or lazy to do so…you reap what you sow and like the quote above states, the best thing I can do in this situation is to find the silver lining and be grateful for it. This may gain me readership that I wouldn’t have had otherwise.

The issue though, still remains…our industry is already in shambles. Less books are being signed and published now than in recent years (no smartass, keep that in context. I’m not comparing 2010 to the dark ages here).  Yet, it’s easier than ever before for authors to network and submit their work. We have computers to write on, instead of relying on type writers (talk about revision hell). We don’t have to send queries via snail mail anymore. It’s also harder to avoid things like reviews and reader reactions. Nearly everyone with a keyboard has a blog these days (with ample opinions and snark to accompany said site).

Have I ever downloaded music illegally? Without answering that directly, I’ll simply say that I’m not a saint. Anything I may have done though, I paid for in spades later out of guilt.

Double-edged sword if I’ve ever seen one. I swear if I ever become independently wealthy, you guys will never see or hear from me again. I’ll legally change my middle name to Hermit.

SO, what now folks? What’s your suggestion? Better yet, what’s your prediction for the future of our industry?

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